Ithaca – A Remediation of the poem for a gaming module

This entry was posted in Adventure Games, Books & Literature, Fantasy Games, Online Games, Role Playing Games by Cleave on

Here is the video that was originally created for the Online Games: Literature, New Media, and Narrative by by Jay Clayton of Vanderbilt University, offered at Coursera

The actual NeverWinter Nights 1 game modual can be downloaded from the following link Ithaca_NWN1. My wife and I spent 35 hours on the creation of the mod and then about an hour setting up for the video. If you down load the mod, it was made with NWN not NWN2 with all expansions as well as CEP 2.4 available at the The NeverWinter Vault

Here is the poem that was used in creating the various different game areas.

Ithaca

As you set out on the way to Ithaca
hope that the road is a long one,
filled with adventures, filled with understanding.
The Laestrygonians and the Cyclopes,
Poseidon in his anger: do not fear them,
you’ll never come across them on your way
as long as your mind stays aloft, and a choice
emotion touches your spirit and your body.
The Laestrygonians and the Cyclopes,
savage Poseidon; you’ll not encounter them
unless you carry them within your soul,
unless your soul sets them up before you.

Hope that the road is a long one.
Many may the summer mornings be
when—with what pleasure, with what joy—
you first put in to harbors new to your eyes;
may you stop at Phoenician trading posts
and there acquire fine goods:
mother-of-pearl and coral, amber and ebony,
and heady perfumes of every kind:
as many heady perfumes as you can.
To many Egyptian cities may you go
so you may learn, and go on learning, from their sages.

Always keep Ithaca in your mind;
to reach her is your destiny.
But do not rush your journey in the least.
Better that it last for many years;
that you drop anchor at the island an old man,
rich with all you’ve gotten on the way,
not expecting Ithaca to make you rich.

Ithaca gave to you the beautiful journey;
without her you’d not have set upon the road.
But she has nothing left to give you any more.

And if you find her poor, Ithaca did not deceive you.
As wise as you’ll have become, with so much experience,
you’ll have understood, by then, what these Ithacas mean.

Translated by Daniel Mendelsohn – Available for free in the original Greek and several English translations at “The Official Website of the Cavafy Archive.”