Details of the author Snowfoxx

Name: Rhonda Drummond
Date registered: November 15, 2010
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Biography and other interesting stuff:

Witccan geek girl who loves anime, cats, RPGS, manga, steampunk, and retro radio.


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A truly natural sugar alternative, Stevia

This entry was posted in Foods by Snowfoxx on

With all the variations of sweeteners out there, sugar, honey, the altered corn sweeteners, plus all the manmade chemical-based ones like sucralose, saccarhin, and aspertame, it can be difficult to find something to take care of a sweets craving, and avoid all the side effects. The best route to take comes from the Andes and has been cultivated there since the days of the Inca, Nazca, and Moche Indians. It’s a little flower that thrives in these mountains, and creates a nectar that is ten times sweeter than sugar, safe for diabetics, and even provides fiber. Take a chance on Stevia someday, and you might finally find that sweet fix you’ve been looking for. You can buy stevia at most supermarkets, and it is found in the baking goods section of the store. There are online stores that feature stevia, like http://www.stevia.com, and http://truvia.com. Try a packet in your tea some time, and you’ll never go back to the pink, blue, or yellow stuff.

Basic energy needs, and a great recipe!

This entry was posted in Foods by Snowfoxx on

It’s time to look beyond the soda pop factor and look for new ways to avoid the altered corn sugars, and all you need is some time, some basic ingredients, and if you can spring for a bread machine, it is a definite plus.
Today you all in for a treat, because I am giving you a simple Italian bread recipe that has become the staple bread in my household. We have not bought any commercial breads, with the exception of Arnold’s Whole Wheat (labeled No High Fructose Corn Syrup) since it was discovered.

Italian Bread

1 cup warm water
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
3 cups bread flour
2 tsp sugar or 3 tbsp honey
1/2 tsp salt
2 1/2 tsp bread yeast

Dextrose, a simple sugar, or is it?

This entry was posted in Foods, Health & Food, Science by Snowfoxx on

When you are reading labels, if you are doing your best to avoid HFCS, you might see other labels in their place. Dextrose is a common sugar that often pops up, and even though its definition is “dextrorotary glucose”, meaning “Sugar rotated to the right” there is more to it than what it shows. Dextrose is another altered corn sugar that should be avoided along with HFCS, and is another stop along the Maize Maze when it comes to sweeteners. According to Livestrong.com, dextrose is known to cause fluid imbalance, which often leads to edema, or as you have heard it called “swelling of the legs”. It is a symptom common among older people, but with more and more dextrose consumption being taken in by young people and children, edema is no longer an old person’s symptom.
Acoording to Livestong.com:
Fluid Overloading

The not-so-sweet culprits

This entry was posted in General by Snowfoxx on

We all know it’s out there, and just about everything, in some manner. It’s HFCS, and it is a slow poison, but not so slow that it does not effect children as well as adults.
How do we avoid these supposedly “natural” ingredients that have nothing to do with nature? Cut down on the number one product that most people in North America take in that contains HFCS, commercial carbonated drinks. I know many will not want to give up on their favourite soft drinks, but once you read some labels, you might find some new flavours out there that will replace your old stand-bys and still give you that sweetness you crave. Some are even made by the cola giants themselves.
Look also for imports, because many countries have outlawed HFCS, and some still use the recipes put in place before 1976 when making their drinks.
Domestically, look for Jones Soda, any Pepsi product with the name “heritage” or “throwback” on the label. Sierra Mist Natural, regular and cranberry are great non-caffinated sodas, too. Look also for store brands, like Winn Dixie Chek Natural or Wynn and Lovett European-Style. From Mexico, and usually found in the Latin foods section of most markets, one can find Barrilitos, Jarritos, and pre-1986 style Coca-Cola. Jarritos comes in a great array of flavours, many people would not consider, like Guava, Red Grapefruit, and Mandarin Orange.
This is just the beginning of how to take your body back to the pre-HFCS days, and it might not undo all the damage right away, but it will stop what has already been started. How you chose to do this is in your own mind, but by looking for these simple labels, you will have a tasty time doing it.

A basic breakdown of HFCS

This entry was posted in Science by Snowfoxx on

Okay, it seems pretty simple, take a corn-based glucose, break it down modify it so it sweeter, then put it back together for a cheaper, altered version of the original, and sell it to every food manufacturer out there. It might be cheap, and effective, but the side effects are far greater than the process. Here is the description of HFCS according to Wikipedia:

High-fructose corn syrup
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High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) – also called isoglucose,[1] maize syrup, or glucose-fructose syrup[2][3] in the UK, and glucose/fructose[4] in Canada – comprises any of a group of corn syrups that has undergone enzymatic processing to convert its glucose into fructose and has then been mixed with pure corn syrup (100% glucose) to produce a desired sweetness. In the United States, consumer foods and products typically use high-fructose corn syrup as a sugar substitute. In the United States, it has become very common in processed foods and beverages, including breads, cereals, breakfast bars, lunch meats, yogurts, soups and condiments.[5]