A basic breakdown of HFCS

This entry was posted in Science by Snowfoxx on

Okay, it seems pretty simple, take a corn-based glucose, break it down modify it so it sweeter, then put it back together for a cheaper, altered version of the original, and sell it to every food manufacturer out there. It might be cheap, and effective, but the side effects are far greater than the process. Here is the description of HFCS according to Wikipedia:

High-fructose corn syrup
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High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) – also called isoglucose,[1] maize syrup, or glucose-fructose syrup[2][3] in the UK, and glucose/fructose[4] in Canada – comprises any of a group of corn syrups that has undergone enzymatic processing to convert its glucose into fructose and has then been mixed with pure corn syrup (100% glucose) to produce a desired sweetness. In the United States, consumer foods and products typically use high-fructose corn syrup as a sugar substitute. In the United States, it has become very common in processed foods and beverages, including breads, cereals, breakfast bars, lunch meats, yogurts, soups and condiments.[5]

The most widely used varieties of high-fructose corn syrup are: HFCS 55 (mostly used in soft drinks), approximately 55% fructose and 42% glucose; and HFCS 42 (used in many foods and baked goods), approximately 42% fructose and 53% glucose.[6] HFCS-90, approximately 90% fructose and 10% glucose, is used in small quantities for specialty applications, but primarily is used to blend with HFCS 42 to make HFCS 55.[7]

You can learn more about the syrup by reading further at the Wiki itself. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-fructose_corn_syrup

But now that we have identified this culprit, we need to find ways to avoid this altered state of sweetness and fix all the damage it might have done, or will do to our bodies. Next time, we will find out exactly what HFCS can do….